Current Trainees

Katie Von Holzen

Katie Von Holzen studies how infants, children, and adults begin to learn a second language at first exposure. She works with  Dr. Rochelle Newman as a postdoctoral researcher in the Hearing and Speech Sciences department at the University of Maryland. She previously worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Université Paris Descartes in France, and earned her PhD in Psychology at the Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen in Germany and her BS in Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in the United States.

Website : http://katiemvonholzen.wixsite.com/katievonholzen
Publications :

Nazzi, T., Poltrock, S., & Von Holzen, K. (2016). The developmental origins of the consonant bias in lexical processing. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 25(4), 291–296. doi: 10.1177/0963721416655786 PDF

 

Bobb, S. C., Drummond Nauck, L. Y., Altvater-Mackensen, N., Von Holzen, K., & Mani, N. (2016). Do bilingual toddlers co-activate cohorts from both languages when hearing words in one language alone? In J. Schwieter (Ed.), Cognitive Control and Consequences of Multilingualism (pp. 47–70). John Benjamins Publishing Company. doi: 10.1075/bpa.2.03bob PDF

 

Von Holzen, K. & Mani, N. (2014). Bilinguals implicitly name objects in both their languages: An ERP study. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01415 PDF

 

Von Holzen, K. (2013). The initial and long-lasting effects of early bilingual language acquisition on lexical access: Evidence from ERP and eye-tracking studies (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany Available upon request

 

Von Holzen, K. & Mani, N. (2012). Language non-selective lexical access in bilingual toddlers. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 113 (4), 569-586, doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2012.08.001 PDF

Adam Fishbien

Adam Fishbien studies how songbirds and parakeets perceive patterns of sounds and how their abilities compare to those of humans. He works with Dr. Robert Dooling as a PhD student in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science Program at the University of Maryland. He previously earned a Master's in Professional Writing at the University of Southern California and BA degrees in Philosophy and Linguistics from the University of Maryland.

Website : https://adamfishbein.com/
Publications :

Grace Capshaw

Grace Capshaw is a graduate student working with Dr. Catherine Carr in the Biological Sciences program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research investigates structural variation, physiological function, and evolutionary adaptation of the inner ear in lungless salamander species. Her research aims to reveal the extra-tympanic strategies that "earless" animals use to detect airborne sound, and may provide insight into the auditory capabilities of early, atympanic tetrapod ancestors.

Website :
Publications :

NORA PRIOR

Nora H Prior is a postdoctoral fellow working with Drs Gregory Ball and Robert Dooling in the Department of Psychology. Her central research interests are focused on identifying the neuroendocrine bases of social bonding. Currently, the majority of research examining the physiological bases of social bonding has focused on parent-offspring bonds and the formation of monogamous pair bonds, predominately in breeding condition mammals. However, human social relationships are altogether more dynamic, mundane and complex than can be interpreted from these models alone. In order to deepen our understanding of social bonding we need model systems that better reflect the variation that exists both within and across social species.

 

Thus far, her research has examined the role of seasonality in the regulation of pair bonding in the monogamously breeding zebra finch. Both affiliative physical and vocal behaviors function to support long-term pair-bond maintenance. Sex steroids in the brain may regulate these behaviors differently depending on breeding condition. Under the direction of Drs Ball and Dooling, she will continue similar research focused on determining whether there is seasonal plasticity in the regulation of male-female vocal interactions in canaries.

Website : https://sites.google.com/site/nhprior/home
Publications :

https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=TbyRo9sAAAAJ&hl=en

BRITTANY JAEKEL

Brittany Jaekel studies how users of cochlear implants perceive and understand aspects of language across the lifespan. She works with Dr. Matthew Goupell and Dr. Rochelle Newman as a PhD student in the Hearing and Speech Sciences department at the University of Maryland. She previously earned her MS in Speech, Language, and Hearing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her BA in Psychology and English at Northwestern University.

Website : http://www.goupelllab.umd.edu/
Publications :