Current Trainees

Heather Carryl

Heather Carryl is a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Patrick Kanold in the Biology department at the University of Maryland. Her research investigates the functional connectivity of developing auditory cortex in vitro, with the use of laser-scanning photostimulation and whole-cell patch clamping. She previously worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Neuroscience Research at Children’s Hospital in Washington, D.C. She earned her PhD in Neuro-developmental Physiology from Howard University.

 

 

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Publications :

Carryl H, Swang M, Lawrence J, Curtis K, Kamboj H, Van Rompay KK, De Paris K, Burke MW. (20150. Of Mice and Monkeys: Can Animal Models Be Utilized to Study Neurological Consequences of Pediatric HIV-1 Infection? ACS Chem Neurosci. 6(8): 1276-1289. PMID: 26034832

Curtis K, Rollins M, Carryl H, Bradshaw K, Van Rompay KK, Abel K, Burke MW. (2015) Reduction of Pyramidal and Immature Hippocampal Neurons in Pediatric SIV Infection. NeuroReport. 25(13) 973-8. PMID: 25102373

Carryl H, Van Rompay KK, De Paris K, Burke MW. (2017). Hippocampal Neuronal Loss in Infant Macaques Orally Infected with Virulent Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV). BrainSci. 10;7(4). PMID: 28394273

Rebecca Bieber

Rebecca studies how humans are able to perceive spoken language, and how listeners can adapt to new talkers in challenging environments. Much of her work focuses on recognition of and adaptation to non-native speech. She works with Dr. Sandra Gordon-Salant as a Ph.D. student in the University of Maryland's Hearing and Speech Science program. She received her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in 2017, and a B.S. in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Emerson College."

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Julie Cohen

Julie is a Ph.D. student in the Hearing and Speech Science program and is mentored by Dr. Sandra Gordon-Salant and Dr. Douglas Brungart. Julie studies how humans are able understand speech in real-world environments. Much of her current work focuses on speech understanding benefits of familiar voices. Julie received her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in 2012, and worked as a research audiologist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center prior to returning to UMD as a Ph.D. student.

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Katie Gwilliam

Katie is a fourth year Human Genetics, PhD student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Working in the lab of Dr. Ronna Hertzano, she studies the genetics and molecular mechanisms of inner ear development and hearing loss. More specifically, Katie researches the roles of specific transcription factors, such as the Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factor family, in hair cell development and maintenance using mice and zebrafish models. She received her B.S. in Biology, with a concentration in Biotechnology and Molecular Biology, and minor in dance at George Mason University. 

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Publications :

Gwilliam, K., Milon, B., Sethna, S., McMurray, M., Vijayakumar, S., Margulies, Z., Jones, S. M., . . Hertzano, R. (2019). Exploring the roles of RFX 1,3 and 7 Alone and in Concert in Hearing and Balance. University of Maryland, Baltimore 41st Graduate Research Conference-Baltimore, MD.

 

Edwards, V. L., Smith, S. B., Mccomb, E. J., Tamarelle, J., Ma, B., Humphrys, M. S., . . . Ravel, J. (2019). The Cervicovaginal Microbiota-Host Interaction Modulates Chlamydia trachomatis Infection. MBio,10(4). doi:10.1128/mbio.01548-19

Allie Johnson

Allie is a PhD student working in Jan Edwards’ Learning to Talk lab. She earned my MS in Speech Pathology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016. Her work is driven by my clinical experiences, and my research agenda requires a translational approach between the lab and the clinic. Her interests are in how young children learn speech and language when their auditory input is compromised due to signal degradation. Primary goals are to: 1) better understand the unique perceptual constraints imposed by cochlear implants; 2) relate specific auditory processing limitations to patterns observed during speech acquisition; and 3) propose new approaches to speech-language intervention to better serve this unique population of children. Allie is also interested in developing more comprehensive speech assessment tools to supplement transcription in the lab and in the clinic.

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Anna Kraemer

Anna studies how inhibition regulates the auditory brainstem in barn owl. Her work focuses on characterizing response types in the superior olivary nucleus, an inhibitory nucleus in the auditory brainstem which send projections to brainstem nuclei involved in sound localization. She works with Dr. Catherine Carr as a Ph.D. student in the University of Maryland’s Neurosciences and Cognitive Sciences program. She received her B.A. in neuroscience from Knox College.

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Publications :

Kraemer A., & Carr, C.E. 2018. Response Types of the Superior Olivary Nucleus in the Barn Owl. Winter 2018. Association for Research in Otolaryngology, Baltimore, MD.

Kuokkanen, P.T., Kraemer, A., Kempter, R., Köppl, C., Carr, C.E. (2018). Auditory Brainstem Response Wave III is Correlated with Extracellular Field Potentials from Nucleus Laminaris of the Barn Owl. Acta Acustica United with Acustica,104:874-877.

Dr. Meg Cychosz

Meg Cychosz is a postdoctoral researcher working with Jan Edwards and Rochelle Newman in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the University of Maryland. She employs computational modeling and digital signal processing to evaluate how the auditory environment interacts with speech development in children from a variety of language backgrounds, including bilingual children and children with cochlear implants. She earned her Ph.D. in Linguistics from UC Berkeley in 2020.

 

Website : http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~mcychosz/
Publications :

Cychosz, M. , Erskine, M., Munson, B., & Edwards, J. (to appear). A lexical advantage in four-year-old children's word repetition. Journal of Child Language.

Cychosz, M. , Munson, B., Edwards, J., & Johnson, K. (2019). Spectral and temporal measures of coarticulation in child speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America-EL, 146(6), EL516-EL522.