Current Trainees

Regina Calloway

Regina Calloway is a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Jonathan Simon in the Institute for Systems Research at the University of Maryland. Regina’s research focuses on neuroplasticity associated with auditory and visual language processing using electroencephalography (EEG/ERPs) and pupillometry. She is also interested in neural mechanisms that underlie cognitive processes of sustained attention, memory encoding, and auditory stream segregation during speech perception. She previously served as a postdoctoral researcher at the Applied Research Laboratory for Intelligence and Security and received her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh.

Publications:

Calloway, R. C., & Perfetti, C. A. (2017). Integrative and predictive processes in text reading: the N400 across a sentence boundary. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 32(8). https://doi.org/10.1080/23273798.2017.1279340

Bruett, H., Calloway, R. C., Tokowicz, N., & Coutanche, M. N. (2020). Neural pattern similarity across concept exemplars predicts memory after a long delay. NeuroImage, 219, 117030.

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Chris Shults

Chris is a second year PhD student in the Molecular Medicine program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. As a member of Dr. Ronna Hertzano’s lab, he investigates the molecular mechanisms contributing to hearing loss and hair cell development. In particular, he aims to study the Ikzf2 pathway using a combination of wet lab and bioinformatics. Chris graduated from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health with a master’s degree in biochemistry and molecular biology. He also received his bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and biology from Tennessee Tech University.

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Anna Tinnemore

Anna studies how the changes in the brain that occur with age affect how a person understands speech -- specifically when listening through a cochlear implant. She is interested in how specific cognitive abilities (such as attention and working memory) influence an individual's ability to extract meaning from sentences presented in challenging environments. She works in the labs of Dr. Sandra Gordon-Salant and Dr. Matthew Goupell at the University of Maryland as a Ph.D. student in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science program. She received a B.A. in Linguistics and a Master's in Computational Linguistics from the University of Washington. She received her Doctorate in Audiology (AuD) from the University of Arizona in 2017.

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Tinnemore, A. R., Zion, D. J., Kulkarni, A. M., & Chatterjee, M. (2018). Children’s recognition of emotional prosody in spectrally degraded speech is predicted by their age and cognitive status. Ear and Hearing, 39(5), 874-880.

 

Waddington, E., Jaekel, B. N., Tinnemore, A. R., Gordon-Salant, S., & Goupell, M. (2020). Recognition of accented speech by cochlear-implant listeners: Benefit of audiovisual cues. Ear and Hearing, 41(5), 1236-1250.

 

Tinnemore, A. R., Gordon-Salant, S., & Goupell, M. J. (2020). Audiovisual speech recognition with a cochlear implant and increased perceptual and cognitive demands. Trends in Hearing, 24, 2331216520960601.

Bieber, R. E., Tinnemore, A. R., Yeni-Komshian, G., & Gordon-Salant, S. (2021). Younger and older adults show nonlinear, stimulus-dependent performance during early stages of auditory training for non-native English. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 149(6), 4348-4365.

Rose Ying

Rose is interested in the neuronal circuits that drive auditory learning behaviors. Currently, she is using in vivo electrophysiology techniques to study subcortical contributions to auditory cortical plasticity during perceptual learning under the guidance of Dr. Melissa Caras. Prior to joining the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science PhD program at UMD, she worked as a research technician at UNC. She received a B.S. in Biology and a minor in Linguistics at Wake Forest University.

 

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Agoglia AE, Zhu M, Quadir SG, Bluitt MN, Douglass E, Hanback T, Tella J, Ying R, Hodge CW, Herman MA. Sex-specific plasticity in CRF regulation of inhibitory control in central amygdala CRF1 neurons after chronic voluntary alcohol drinking. Addict Biol. 2021 Jun 2:e13067. doi: 10.1111/adb.13067. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34075665.

 

Pratt WE, Vaca-Tricerri R, Blanchard AC, Hopkins TR, Ilesanmi AO, Pierce-Messick Z, Rosner IA, Ying R. Selective serotonin receptor stimulation of the ventral tegmentum differentially affects appetitive motivation for sugar on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Behav Brain Res. 2021 Jan 23;403:113139. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2021.113139. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33497748.

 

Agoglia AE, Zhu M, Ying R, Sidhu H, Natividad LA, Wolfe SA, Buczynski MW, Contet C, Parsons LH, Roberto M, Herman MA. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor-1 Neurons in the Lateral Amygdala Display Selective Sensitivity to Acute and Chronic Ethanol Exposure. eNeuro. 2020 Mar 5;7(2):ENEURO.0420-19.2020. doi: 10.1523/ENEURO.0420-19.2020. PMID: 32041742; PMCID: PMC7059189.

 

Otis JM, Zhu M, Namboodiri VMK, Cook CA, Kosyk O, Matan AM, Ying R, Hashikawa Y, Hashikawa K, Trujillo-Pisanty I, Guo J, Ung RL, Rodriguez-Romaguera J, Anton ES, Stuber GD. Paraventricular Thalamus Projection Neurons Integrate Cortical and Hypothalamic Signals for Cue-Reward Processing. Neuron. 2019 Aug 7;103(3):423-431.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2019.05.018. Epub 2019 Jun 10. PMID: 31196673; PMCID: PMC6773659.

 

Bobby Gibbs

Bobby Gibbs is a postdoctoral fellow with translational focus, working with Ronna Hertzano and Matt Goupell at the Maryland Cochlear Implant Center of Excellence. Bobby’s research brings together genetic, electrophysiological and psychophysical measures to explain variability in temporal processing and acoustic cue utilization in cochlear implant listeners. He previously served as a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders the University of South Carolina. He earned his Ph.D. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in architectural acoustics with an emphasis on spatial hearing.

 

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Publications :

Gibbs, B. E., & Fogerty, D. (2018). Explaining intelligibility in speech-modulated maskers using acoustic glimpse analysis. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 143(6), EL449–EL455. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.5041466

 

Miller, R. E., Gibbs, B. E., & Fogerty, D. (2018). Glimpsing speech interrupted by speech-modulated noise. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 143(5), 3058–3067. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.5038273

James Baldessano

James is a PhD student in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) program at UMD in the lab of Dr. Katrina MacLeod. He currently studies the chick auditory brainstem, working to understand the biophysical features that underlie the heterogeneous phenotypes and temporal properties in sound intensity circuits and inhibitory populations. He has his BA in Biology from Binghamton University in 2016.

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Katherine Palandrini

Katie is a Ph.D. student in the Hearing and Speech Sciences program and is mentored by Dr. Eric Hoover. Her research interests include psychoacoustics and the translation of laboratory tests into clinical tools to improve diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes for people with hearing loss. Katie received her B.S. from Northeastern University in 2016 and worked as a research assistant in the Auditory and Speech Sciences Laboratory at the University of South Florida prior to joining UMD as a Ph.D. student.

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